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Friday, June 29, 2012

Evolution Of Yonge Street In Canada

Evolution Of Yonge Street In Canada

Yonge Street (pronounced "young") is a major arterial route connecting the shores of Lake Ontario in Toronto to Lake Simcoe, a gateway to the Upper Great Lakes. It was formerly listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the longest street in the world at 1,896 km (1,178 mi), and the construction of Yonge Street is designated an Event of National Historic Significance. Yonge Street was fundamental in the original planning and settlement of western Upper Canada in the 1790s, informing the basis of the concession roads in Ontario today. Long the southernmost leg of Highway 11, linking the capital with northern Ontario, Yonge has been referred to as "Main Street Ontario". A large part of the route follows an ancient well-established Aboriginal trail that linked the Lake Ontario waterfront to northern parts of the region. It was also the site of Canada's first subway line.
The street was named by Ontario's first colonial administrator for his friend Sir George Yonge, an expert on ancient Roman roads.

Looking north from Temperance Street in 1903, showing the Confederation Life Building.

 

Looking north from Temperance Street in 2008.

 

Northwest corner of Yonge and Dundas, 1926.

 

Northwest corner of Yonge and Dundas, 2008

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